5 Ideas, Programs, or Resources You Should Know About

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1. Next Generation Science Standards

NSTA offers the final version of the Next Generation Science Standards.  These standards establish learning expectations in science for K–12 students combining three important dimensions—science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts.
http://www.nextgenscience.org/

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2. Discover Your World with NOAA

This free activity book introduces The Essential Principles of Climate Science and will help users learn about Earth’s climate system, the factors that drive and change it, and more.  You can download the full activity book or individual activities.  Sections focus on exploring, understanding, and protecting the earth.  Check out Make Your Own Astrolabe, Wooly Magma, and Endangered Species Origami.
http://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/edufun/book/#book

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3. Eco-Schools USA Climate Change Connections

National Wildlife Federation’s Eco-Schools USA and NASA offer this comprehensive high school curriculum using NASA Earth Observing Satellites data.  Students use environmental audits, action planning, data collection, and more to experience the Earth system as a whole.
http://www.nwf.org/Eco-Schools-USA/Become-an-Eco-School/Pathways/Climate-Change/What-is-Climate-Change-Connections.aspx

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4. The Story in the Ice: Glaciers and Climate Change

This climate change initiative offers the first set of lesson plans in a middle school curriculum being developed by the Earth Day Network and Extreme Ice Survey to educate, engage, and mobilize students around climate change.  The two-day set of lessons are correlated to national learning standards and seek to engage students in interdisciplinary learning experiences.
http://www.earthday.org/climatechange

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5. Global Schoolyard Bioblitz

Project Noah is once again teaming up with the National Environmental Education Foundation and National Geographic Education for the Global Schoolyard Bioblitz campaign.  Teachers and students document the wildlife encountered in and around their school sites.  The National Geographic website offers tools for any bioblitz, and students can upload their data to the Project Noah website.  Be sure to check out the educator resources.
http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/10164691

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