Archive | Community-based EE

P13 - Nathan

Ear to the ground

Native Voices: Reclaiming a Culture through the Traditional Canoe Interview with Nathan Piengkham (In conjunction with Blooming Culture: The Canoe as a Vessel for Exploring Cultures) Nathan Piengkham is a member of the Kalispel Tribe and the Executive Director of The River Warrior Society. Members of the fourth-grade crew interviewed him about his involvement in […]

Continue Reading 0
Neal-Maine-(MB) 2adj

E.E.’s Philosopher King

Not One More Cute Project for the Kids: Neal Maine’s Educational Vision   by Gregory A. Smith Lewis & Clark College, Professor Emeritus PART ONE eal Maine, now in his late-70s is an iconic figure for many environmental educators in the state of Oregon. Early in his teaching career in Seaside, he decided to shelve […]

Continue Reading 0

E.E.’s Philosopher King (Pt 2)

Not One More Cute Project for the Kids: Neal Maine’s Educational Vision   by Gregory A. Smith Lewis & Clark College, Professor Emeritus   PART TWO (see Part One here) Sustaining Neal’s Place-Based Vision of Education: Lessons Learned Despite the power and attractiveness of these educational practices, few of them remain in evidence after the […]

Continue Reading 2
Bringing School to Life - Anderson

Book Review: Place-based Education

Enlivening Students   by Gregory A. Smith   Review of Sarah Anderson’s, Bringing School to Life: Place-Based Education across the Curriculum (Lanham, Massachusetts: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017) or the past two decades, books and articles written by place- and community-based advocates have been largely focused on defining and justifying an alternative approach to teaching and […]

Continue Reading 0
DillinghamSeaWeekUSFWS(1)

E2E Grant Project Report – Alaska

E2E Grant Project Report Evaluate EE Programs for Systemic Change in Your Community How to improve the effectiveness of teacher professional development in environmental education   By Cathy Rezabeck, Marilyn Sigman and Beverly Parsons illingham, Alaska is a rural community in western Alaska with about 2,400 residents, including a substantial population of Yup’ik Eskimos. It […]

Continue Reading 0

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes