Archive | Theory of learning

Stepping Into Nature 2013June04

Classroom without walls

“Mr. D., that was the best science class I’ve ever had!” The trials and successes of a classroom without walls By Greg Derbyshire he above feedback, made by a grade 8 student, is one of many similar comments made to me by students and parents who recognize and appreciate the opportunities provided by outdoor experiential […]

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Jim Martin: Arts and Humanities in the Sciences?

Arts and Humanities in the Sciences? Is that incongruous, or what? By Jim Martin Have you ever ‘felt’ the weather as cloud formations began to change? I love to watch Mares’ Tails form; multiple long extensions of a cumulus cloud that race out ahead, then turn up and curl back. They signal a change in […]

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On Teaching Science

What’s the Difference… …between a single performer and an energetic band? Can students teach themselves? by Jim Martin CLEARING Master Teacher n an earlier set of blogs, we followed a middle school class whose science teacher had started them on a project to study a creek that flows at the edge of the school ground. […]

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Teaching Science Inquiry

Can I become a science inquiry facilitator? . . . If I’ve never been one? by Jim Martin What do I need to be competent in, comfortable with, being a facilitator instead of a top-down teacher? I think a first thing is the recognition that people can learn on their own; that they don’t need […]

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field trip plant study

Bird Language

Creating the Need to Pay Attention Field trips and adventures in the woods are tremendously important experiences for children, especially those students that don’t often get to spend time in a natural setting. Some of the most important, lasting results of good Environmental Education are the heartfelt connections that young people make with nature. They […]

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